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2014 CONFERENCE INFO


Please visit www.anzcies2014.com for information regarding The 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society, being hosted by Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia from the 26-28 November 2014

2013 CONFERENCE INFO


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Conference Theme: Learning and Living in the world and with the world: New possibilities for space, place, and time in Comparative and International Education

The 41st Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society (ANZCIES)

University of Newcastle,
NSW, Australia

26-28 November 2013

The conceptual categories of ‘space’, ‘place’ and ‘time’ have served as the implicit conceptual building blocks of educational comparison from the days of ‘traveller’s tales’ to the current discussions about de- and re-territorialisation in Comparative and International Education (CIE). In our contemporary space of imagination and investigation - which some scholars refer to as globality - “social science is something far more demanding and consequential, than an interest in ‘globalization’, in challenges to the sovereignty of the nation-state, or in transoceanic shifts of production and capital” (Therborn, 2000: 51). In globality, our understanding of place - in which space and time are contained (Casey, 2009) - is central to our way of being in the world and with the world. In the space of globality there is no naturally given privileged observation post and no absolute time.

Into the new millennium, national education policies around the world had international, transnational, and global dimensions (Rizvi 2006), and claimed to prepare citizens for supra-national society (Meyer, 2006). At the same time, education systems struggle to respond to many features of globality, including intensified mobility of people, ideas and objects. To study education in globality means to complicate how we think about space, place and time in ways that move beyond simply looking for the global in the local and vice versa.

If we take as a given that the varied processes of globalisation have fundamentally transformed our individual imaginations and social imaginaries (Appadurai 1996; Taylor 2004), then we are challenged to critically examine (and possibly revise) our own standpoints. We need to consider how globality has reconfigured our points of reference and, of course, our comparative inquiries.

The Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society (ANZCIES) is pleased to invite educationalists to participate in its 41st Annual Conference on the theme of Learning and Living in the world and with the world.

Possible lines of inquiry include:

  • What theories have the explanatory power to conceptualise education in contemporary conditions?
  • How does globality shape our intellectual imaginations, theoretical arguments and empirical investigations, and how might these constitute a new identity for CIE?
  • What are the relationships between the epistemologies of indigenous knowledges and other conceptions of knowledge?
  • How can we rethink units of analysis in CIE, such as the nation-state, civil society, world-systems?
  • How can social movements, researchers, activists, and policy-makers engage with and respond to growing inequalities on a global scale?
  • How can we reconceptualise the idea of mass / universal education (its organisation, curricula, pedagogical practice) and ‘development’ in contemporary conditions?
  • How are histories written and represented in educational thinking, research, policies and practices?

***

References

Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at Large. University of Minnesota Press.

Casey, E. (2009) Getting back into place: Toward a renewed understanding of the place-world. (2nd ed.) Bloomington, Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.

Meyer, J.W. (2006) World models, national curricula, and the centrality of the individual. In School knowledge in comparative and historical perspective: Changing curricula in primary and secondary education., eds Benavot, A and Braslavsky, C. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre.

Rizvi, F. (2006). Imagination and the Globalization of Educational Policy Research. Globalization, Education and Societies, Vol. 4, No. 2., pp. 193-206

Taylor, C. (2004) Modern Social Imaginaries. Duke University Press.

Therborn, G. (2000) At the birth of second century sociology: times of reflexivity, spaces of identity, and nodes of knowledge. British Journal of Sociology Vol. 51, No. 1., pp. 37-57.

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Upcoming Events

Please visit www.anzcies2014.com for information regarding The 42nd Annual Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society, being hosted by Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia from the 26-28 November 2014